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Why do I itch like crazy after a shower?

March 15, 2021

Why do I itch like crazy after a shower?

Take shorter, cooler showers: Taking short, cool showers is the first (and easiest!) thing Dr. Axe says "you can try to ease the post-shower. Think warm not scalding."  People love taking long, hot showers during the cold winter months. For some people, taking a shower brings an uncomfortable side effect: irritating, persistent itching. Your skin […]

Why do I itch like crazy after a shower?

Take shorter, cooler showers: Taking short, cool showers is the first (and easiest!) thing Dr. Axe says "you can try to ease the post-shower. Think warm not scalding." 

People love taking long, hot showers during the cold winter months. For some people, taking a shower brings an uncomfortable side effect: irritating, persistent itching. Your skin gets dry after getting dressed. For most of us, this symptom is mild, only lasts a few minutes, and is related to dry skin caused by cold, dry air, and long, hot showers. Itching after you take a bath or shower isn’t uncommon and very uncomfortable feeling. It can be caused by dry skin or other skin conditions.

Today there are two types of people that shower. You have those who prefer comfortable, lukewarm showers, and those who live for their super hot borderline scalding showers. If you are like me I fall into the latter category. Chances are it’s the hot shower itself that might be causing your skin to itch. When you finish your shower or bath, the water that left on your skin evaporates, and as it does, it sucks moisture and oils from your skin. This dryness is accelerated by taking hot showers because heat causes more evaporation.  

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But let's look at some other factors too. Uncured soaps may have uncured lye that is used in soap production. If the bar of soap is not fully cured and tested for the proper pH this will cause skin sensitivity issues. Lye-heavy soaps tend to dry out the skin and leave it feeling sensitive to the touch.

Use a gentle cleanser: If you have an inkling that perhaps it is your cleanser that is making your skin itchy, Blue Bison Soapery body soaps are as gentile as soap gets and still hold a superior cleaning powers, dermatologist and doctors recommend switching to a gentler cleanser made for dry, sensitive skin. They tend to use kinder surfactants. Harsh cleansers with bright colors, strong lathers, and fancy fragrances will only dry out your skin even more!

Fragrances used in soap making can cause to dry the skin out and irritate it because of the alcohol used in making fragrances. This alcohol help's in stripping away natural oil from the skin faster in hot showers. Also, the use of phthalate found in fragrances, detergents, shampoos, plastic, vinyl flooring manufacturing, and more have shown to irritate people with sensitive skin.

Most mass-production bars of "soap" really have no soap to them. Most soap manufacturers use synthetic detergents, the kind that is used in making dish detergents and laundry detergents. We are by far not laundry or dishes! We have skin that is living.
All the harsh chemicals used in synthetic detergents like dioxane, parabens, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) have side effects that are unhealthy to your body, soul, dry skin, liver damage, depression, cancer, and harmful reproductive systems.

If you have ever purchased a handmade soap bar from a local soap store or your local Farmers Market, and you run into dryness or skin irritation after using the soap, it might be caused by a low super-fat. Without getting too scientific, super-fat is the amount of oils in a recipe that are not transformed into soap during the saponification process (the chemical reaction in which the building blocks of fats and oils react with lye to form soap). Soap sometimes cleans so well that it dries or irritates the skin. A higher super-fat ensures that the soap is mild to your skin.

Many shoppers on the hunt for an all-natural soap bar, might grab that nice soap bar with 100% Coconut Oil, thinking that it is good for their skin. Don't be fooled! Even though Coconut Oil has many health benefits in its natural state, it is not as great as a 100% soap. Coconut Oil is so efficient at saponifying that there are no free oils left in the soap that will moisturize your skin. For that reason, we choose to use Coconut Oil at 20% maximum in our recipes, together with other mild and skin-loving oils to ensure a fantastic, cleansing, and sudsy bar of soap that is moisturizing, nourishing, and mild for the skin.

The cleanser you are using may be stripping away the natural oils your body produces. This may be a sign that your cleanser may be the culprit as they may be too aggressive and this leads to more dryness. Dryness that irritates the skin, which then causes itching, redness, and sensitive scaling.

How can I deal with itchy skin after a shower?

Apply moisturizer while you’re still damp: At first, your instinct might be to grab your towel to dry off as soon as you get out of the shower, we at Blue Bison Soapery recommend to pat dry and slather your body in moisturizer like Blue Bison body cream while you’re skin is damp to help lock in the moisture. You can also reapply moisturizing body cream throughout the day to recharge and invigorate your energy. 

Be sure to stay away from moisturizers with excessive strong-smelling fragrances as they can create irritant reactions with already dry-itchy skin. Instead, we at Blue Bison Soapery recommend natural skin moisturizers that are rich in Jojoba Oil, Coconut Oil, Aloe Vera, Cocoa Butter, and Shea Butter. If you need something more heavy-duty for those extremely dry patches, we suggest trying to spot treat.

Blue Bison Soapery Vegan Friendly Facial Kit

Blue Bison botanical face cleanser, is a gentile all natural cleanser that helps reduce that dry itchy feeling on the face.
Words to live by: The simpler the cleanser, the better. 

Pinpoint the environmental triggers: If the after-shower itchiness is chronic, Dr. Axe suggests doing a bit of investigative work to nail down what might be triggering it. Dr. Axe says "it could be a sign of an underlying condition ranging, such as contact dermatitis (aka you’re reacting to a product in your skin-washing regimen) eczema, environmental inputs including cosmetic products, laundry detergents, soaps, and lotions. Keep a notebook handy and write down when the itchiness happens and remember what products you used or what other environmental factors might have caused the reaction." 

https://www.ecocenter.org/healthy-stuff/reports/vinyl-floor-tiles/flooring_phthalate_hazards

https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2016-09/documents/1-4-dioxane.pdf

https://www.cdc.gov/biomonitoring/Parabens_BiomonitoringSummary.html

https://davidsuzuki.org/queen-of-green/dirty-dozen-sodium-laureth-sulfate/

Article written by Claudia Sammer

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